KS3 Homework

Class Homework

Your son’s English teacher will set homework tasks linked to work done in class on a regular basis. All teachers maintain a class blog where they publish daily and weekly homework along with their lesson content, student work, and resources.

Reading Homework

We expect every student to spend one to two hours a week reading.

Daily reading, before going to bed for example, can be relaxing and helps to establish a regular routine. Reading on long bus or tube journeys is a good way of using that time productively. Spread reading across the week in short bursts or make time during the weekend.

We recommend that you read topics that interest you – this can include the sports section of the newspaper or online sport reports or using the internet to find out information on a topic you want to know more about. Manga books and graphic novels are enjoyed by many and if you don’t have a lot of time to read short stories can be a good choice as you can complete one at a time.

Write down the title and author of any books you read as you will be asked to do a presentation in class on your extended reading – your teacher will explain more about this in class.

Some suggestions for choosing a book:

  • Find a genre (type of story) that you like (e.g. adventure and action or crime) and read range of books in that genre.
  • Find other books by the same author if you have enjoyed a particular book or read books in a series, e.g. A series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snicket or the Alex Rider books by Anthony Horowitz.
  • Read the blurb on the back of a book and decide if it interests you.
  • Look at the first page of the book to see if it grabs your attention – if you find more than five words on the first page you have difficulty understanding you may want to choose something else as it may slow you down if you have to find the meaning of too many words on one page.
  • Ask a friend or the librarian or a teacher for a recommendation!

Websites you can visit:

www.bookbuzz.org.uk

All year 7 students will be able to choose one of the books on the Bookbuzz website, so reading more about the books will help you to make an informed choice.

Every year the Carnegie Medal is awarded to a book of children’s fiction, judged by librarians and shadowed by hundreds of students across the country. If you want to see the winners since the start of this annual and probably best known children’s fiction award in the UK, go to the following website, you may find it a handy guide when trying to find new books that interest you. http://www.carnegiegreenaway.org.uk/carnegie/full_list_of_winners.php

For parents & students:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/childrens-books-site

This is a brilliant site for suggestions on what to read, reviews written by students, interviews and much more. Make this your first stop!

For further information and research about reading go to

http://www.booktrust.org.uk

Places to visit:

The British Library (next to St Pancras Station) is free to visit and they also run interesting workshops or talks. Special exhibitions usually charge a fee, the current exhibition till the end of September is Writing Britain and contains many manuscripts of authors, including a handwritten page of one of the Harry Potter books! But you don’t even have to visit for an amazing experience. Go to the website and you are able to ‘turn’ the pages of some of the manuscripts!

http://www.bl.uk/

The British Museum has an excellent website as well and often run workshops aimed at families. Museum entry is free except for special exhibitions, the current Shakespeare exhibition focuses on London in 1612 through Shakespeare’s plays and was planned to link with the Olympics and will run till 25 November. (Children under 16 free.)

http://www.britishmuseum.org/

Class Homework

Your son’s English teacher will set homework tasks linked to work done in class on a regular basis. Some teachers maintain a class blog where they publish daily and weekly homework along with their lesson content, student work, and resources.

Reading Homework

We expect every student to spend one to two hours a week reading.

Daily reading, before going to bed for example, can be relaxing and helps to establish a regular routine. Reading on long bus or tube journeys is a good way of using that time productively. Spread reading across the week in short bursts or make time during the weekend.

Class Homework

Your son’s English teacher will set homework tasks linked to work done in class on a regular basis. Some teachers maintain a class blog where they publish daily and weekly homework along with their lesson content, student work, and resources.

Reading Homework

We expect every student to spend one to two hours a week reading.

Daily reading, before going to bed for example, can be relaxing and helps to establish a regular routine. Reading on long bus or tube journeys is a good way of using that time productively. Spread reading across the week in short bursts or make time during the weekend.

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